Wordless Wednesday: Only a Mother Could Love…Nursing Pads

nursing mother family

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I hate these pictures of myself. But I also love them. Guess why.


Mommyjuice. It’s About Time.

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My favorite thing about MommyJuice Wines is the origin of the brand name. Founded by a sales chief for Clos LaChance winery in the Central Coast of California, MommyJuice was so named because her kids learned to avoid her wine glasses, calling them “Mommy’s juice!”

I mean, what do YOU tell your kids when they ask for a sip of your wine? I once allowed Kyle to taste my beer – yeah, I said it – and he immediately let his mouth open and the entire little sip of beer fell directly into my lap. He never asked again. But if the kids reach for my wine glass, I simply tell them “You wouldn’t like this.”

That’s for much, much later in your life, kid.

MommyJuice Wine comes in simple white or red. I’m partial to the red, because it is reminiscent of the red table wine I used to drink with my chicken parmigiana at Bruno’s, the tiny little Italian restaurant in Santa Monica, just south of the pier. My pals and I met there almost every weekend, pre-children. Ah, those were the days.

Parenting is wonderful and life changing, of course, but it’s funny to me that there is finally a wine that just says what it is. Mommy likes her wine, dudes. Let’s just tell it like it is.

IMG_7349 IMG_7350 MommyJuice Wines are available at select CVS Pharmacy stores and Northern California Target stores, as well as in various retail outlets nationwide. Wine and Mother’s Day gift packs can be purchased online at www.mommyjuicewines.com. I made it to CVS for those photos when my own mother was visiting last weekend. She helped me make my first stop-motion animated video using the Vine app:

Symbolism: we can’t really keep wine in the house, because it keeps disappearing.

The “shoot” was fun – my mom created the backdrop, and then drank the props.
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mom drinks the props

You can win a set of MommyJuice stemless glasses by posting your own photos of MommyJuice on the shelf at your local CVS store to the MommyJuice Facebook page. Five winners will be chosen at the end of May. And you know, you should check out the page anyway, because it’s pretty damn funny. I just love the voice of this brand.

Being a mom is a constant juggling act. MommyJuice is a an adorable gift for any hostess, friend or family member who is a mother. It’s owned and made by a mom. MommyJuice Wines are from the California Central Coast and come in Red Wine (77% Cabernet Sauvignon, 16% Merlot, 3% Malbec, 2% Cabernet Franc, 2% Petit Verdot) and White Wine (100% Chardonnay from Monterey County in California).

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls Collective, and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

What’s the Big Deal About Standardized Tests?

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My second grader started “STAR” testing today, with the usual fanfare of an 8-year-old boy.

“How did it go?” I asked.

“I don’t know,” he mumbled.

“Was it like regular school?”

“I guess. Can I have a snack?”

His teacher started having the kids do practice tests about two weeks ago. He got every question right on every one. I would venture to say that the tests were too easy.

The kids don’t have homework this week. They are encouraged to get enough exercise, to eat a healthy breakfast, etc. These are things they should be doing every day, right?

My kid is bright, catches on easily, and likes tests as a challenge, especially math. His teacher told him that STAR testing is a method of making the state better and I suppose that is a nice vague explanation. I’m sure the school could be doing better things with the children’s time, like teaching them more things, I guess. But when I think about learning, and how I learn, and how children learn, I know that they can’t be constantly sitting in instruction. A few days of testing can’t hurt, right?

I have seen a lot of kerfluffle over the years about standardized testing, and teaching to the test, and so far I haven’t witnessed it in our school. So what’s the big deal?

photo from sonoma.edu

Forehead Smack: Quitter, by Jon Acuff

It only generates obscene amounts of hurt and frustration to pursue a 40-hour-a-week dream in a week that currently has four hours of available free time.

Yes. That.

I have many more observations about what I’m reading here, including the one that I wanted to hate this guy from the start because he started a blog and just a few years later is a well-known author and speaker. Shazam, like magic. But so far I can’t hate him. He’s charming and self-deprecating and his famous blog took advantage of a popular gimmick. Well played, Acuff.

I’m only on page 109, and there’s more where that came from. Tune in sometime in the near future for the rest of my thoughts about this book. In the meantime I’m going to practice being grateful for what I have instead of focusing on what I don’t have, and what I want. I don’t even know what that is right now anyway.

Quitter, by Jon Acuff